The Scoop - The Blog For Kids World

I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy

I Dissent book cover: illustration of supreme court justice Ruth Bader ginsburg"Step by step, she has made a difference... one disagreement after another."

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, also known as the Notorious RBG, was the first Jewish woman on the United States Supreme Court and, at nearly 84 years old, she still serves on the Court today. Learn about Ruth's childhood and the injustice she personally faced as a woman and as a Jewish person and how this inspired her to break barriers and stand up for not only herself, but for others facing injustice as well. To become the change you wish to see in the world, there is no better place to start than with Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Hand this title to readers of all ages, particularly those in elementary school, who have a strong voice, a passion for justice and politics, or who want to learn more about one of the most important female figures of modern times.

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Brittany, Kids World

Snow White by Matt Phelan

Snow White book cover: a red cover with a black silhouette of an apple"An apple for a pretty thing?"

Most readers are familiar with the story of Snow White, so there will be no real surprises in plot here. However, knowing what is coming just adds to the artful suspense in this graphic novel. Phelan frames his retelling of Snow White in New York City during the late 1920s/early 1930s. Here, Snow White is the daughter of the "King of Wall Street," and the evil stepmother a "Broadway Queen."

Fans of Phelan's Storm in the Barn will find this a tad more sinster in tone.  Deliciously dark, the art leaves much of the acts of violence to the imagination, depicting the omnious results, and is all the more powerful for it.  The fantastical fairy tale is enriched by its historical dressings. The magic mirror has become a stock printer, which is not only a great introduction with the technology of the time, but an ingenious metaphor. Tuberculosis, the stock market crash, the display windows all feature prominently in the plot line. The art stays true to the time period as well, depicting appriopriate room furnishings and clothing.

True to Phelan's style, there is not a lot of text bogging up the pages of this graphic novel, and many panels rely solely on the art to move the story along. A sly "quick" read that invites multiple re-readings to pore over subtlies in the evocative art. This graphic novel is recommended for grades 4 and up.

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Celeste, Kids World

How This Book Was Made by Mac Barnett

How This Book Was Made: an illustrated tiger, hamburger, and storm cloud are in the center with pages and paper all aroundThe first draft of this book was not so good. Neither was the second draft. Or the third. Or the twelfth.

Want to learn how this book got made? Here we go! There are tigers, editors, pirates, illustrations, astronauts, machines, lots of waiting, and an eagle. You got all that? But even after all that, it’s still not a real book. Can you guess what’s still missing?

“How This Book Was Made” is a great read-aloud for parents to share where reality and fantasy collide, making this book just plain fun. Introducing the basics and expectations for aspiring writers and readers as to how books come about, this ‘instructional’ is far from boring!

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Naomi, Kids World

Echo Echo by Marilyn Singer

Echo Echo book cover: illustrations of a couple on a lake, the reverse of the image is seen as a reflections"Ancient Greece: An age of marvelous myths, gone, but not forgotten. Heroes that rise and fall."
"Heroes that rise and fall, gone, but not forgotten. An age of marvelous myths: Ancient Greece."

Enter the world of Ancient Greek mythology in Marilyn Singer's third installment of reverso poems. Each myth is presented as a different type of poem, sometimes freeform and sometimes rhyming, but always able to be flipped upside down and still make sense. Not only will readers learn the different myths of Ancient Greece in poem form, but many myths also have accompanying footnotes for further explanation.

This book is recommended for students in grades 2-6 who enjoy mythology or poetry and wordplay. Be sure to also check out the author's other fairy tale reverso offerings, Mirror Mirror and Follow Follow.

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Brittany, Kids World

Guess who, Haiku! by Deanna Caswell

Guess Who Haiku book cover: illustartions of various creatures peaking out around a cloud which holds the title text“two hands hold a book / guessing animals’ puzzles / written in haiku”

This playful treat of a picture book offers the simplest of haiku riddles to younger readers. The answer to each is an animal and each animal then gives the next set of clues. The pastel colors and soft images have a classic nursery sensibility. The author’s endnote explains the elements and origin of haiku in a friendly tone and even suggests another way to read the mini poems.

Toddlers and their grown up readers will share the excitement of words and guessing games. The kiddos will be rewarded for their careful listening and thinking with each page turn.

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Mary Jo, Kids World

A Bike Like Sergio’s by Maribeth Boelts

A Bike Like Sergio's book cover: illustration of a book riding a bicycle with another walking behind“I wish,” I say, but I know that wishes won’t make money appear.

Sergio has a really great bike. Ruben only wishes he had a bike at all. With his birthday near, Ruben knows that even if he asked for a bike, his family could never afford it. In his despair, Ruben sees a lady drop a dollar bill at the grocery store. Snapping it up fast, Ruben is shocked to find out when he gets home that it’s actually a one hundred dollar bill. Maybe Ruben will get that bike for his birthday after all?

Each day our children are faced with many choices, and the courage it takes to do what’s right doesn’t always come easy. In A Bike Like Sergio’s, Ruben has a difficult decision to make. Using his own reasoning, and a little time, Ruben ultimately finds a non-fairytale ending that doesn’t sugarcoat the realities of life, but rather celebrates doing the right thing above all else. This picture book is recommended for lower and mid-elementary students.

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Naomi, Kids World

Some Writer by Melissa Sweet

Some Writer book cover: Images of book spines and one book facing out with a man feeding a pig featured onit"Hang on to your hat. Hang on to your hope. Wind the clock, for tomorrow is another day."
"I would rather wait a year than publish a bad children's book, as I have too much respect for children."

If you've ever wondered how a writer becomes a writer, how a writer decides to write children's books, or where ideas for some of your favorite classic children's books came from, you need to read Some Writer! Follow Elwyn Brooks White's journey from his childhood summers spent on a lake in Maine to his years writing for a new (at the time) magazine, The New Yorker, to his inspiration and decision to write books for children. Peppered with quotations from E. B. White's journals, which he kept throughout most of his life, you will get both the inside and outside view of the man, the myth, the writer.

This book is recommended for readers in grades 2-6 who have enjoyed the various works of E. B. White, or who aspire to be writers themselves.

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Brittany, Kids World

Bring Me A Rock! by Daniel Miyares

Bring me a rock book cover: five various sized bugs are holding up a rock upon which a grasshopper stands on top"BRING ME A ROCK! THE BIGGER THE BETTER."

In an Aesop reminiscent of Seuss' Yertle the Turtle, Grasshopper is King of the bugs and he wants a giant throne of rocks...now!
Beetle, Mantis and Centipede all bring the biggest rocks they can find; but, will the littlest bug's pebble be enough?

Told through dialogue and a modern; but, naturalistic art style, Bring Me A Rock! makes the perfect canvas for reading out loud or becoming one of a child's first picture books to read on their own.

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Jennifer, Kids World

Sophie’s Squash Go to School By Pat Zietlow Miller and Anne Wilsdorf

Sophie's Squash Go To School book cover: an illustration of young girl in pigtails walking on road towards school building with a squash in each arm and wearing a backpack“Sometimes growing a friend just takes time.”

Sophie’s parents said she’d have fun at school. But she didn’t. The chairs were uncomfortable, the milk tasted funny, nobody appreciated her two squash friends Bonnie and Baxter, and Steven just won’t leave her alone! Sophie isn’t interested in making new friends when she already has her squash friends from her garden. But what happens when her food friends start to rot?

School is a huge part of children’s lives, and along with that come dealing with new friendships. For some children who are sensitive, this is no easy task. In this book, Sophie repeatedly rejects any extension of friendship from other children. Until through her own eyes and experiences, she comes to the conclusion that friends are all different, and in the end, worth it.

Sequel to Sophie's Squash.

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Naomi, Kids World

The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game by Nancy Churnin

William Hoy story book cover: an illustration of a baseball player sliding onto base with an umpire's arms out to the sides behind him"His mother waved her arms. She was applauding him."

Have you ever wondered what made baseball umpires start using signs? Find out in this informational picture book!

Not many people knew sign language back in the 1880s and that led to problems for William when trying to pursue his dream of playing baseball professionally. From being paid less than other players to not being able to read the umpire's lips, William couldn't seem to find a way to compete even though he was a great ball player. Remembering his mother waving her arms in applause when he practiced at home, William came up with a solution: the common baseball signs you see used in the game today. William went on to set records in the National and American Leagues playing on many different teams (even the Chicago White Stockings!) and baseball was changed forever... for the better.

With the World Series over but not forgotten, many readers may be interested in learning more about baseball's rich history. This title on the topic would suit readers in 1st grade and up who are interested in baseball, history, or deafness and how to be inclusive to people with disabilities.

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Brittany, Kids World

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