The Scoop - The Blog For Kids World

Echo Echo by Marilyn Singer

Echo Echo book cover: illustrations of a couple on a lake, the reverse of the image is seen as a reflections"Ancient Greece: An age of marvelous myths, gone, but not forgotten. Heroes that rise and fall."
"Heroes that rise and fall, gone, but not forgotten. An age of marvelous myths: Ancient Greece."

Enter the world of Ancient Greek mythology in Marilyn Singer's third installment of reverso poems. Each myth is presented as a different type of poem, sometimes freeform and sometimes rhyming, but always able to be flipped upside down and still make sense. Not only will readers learn the different myths of Ancient Greece in poem form, but many myths also have accompanying footnotes for further explanation.

This book is recommended for students in grades 2-6 who enjoy mythology or poetry and wordplay. Be sure to also check out the author's other fairy tale reverso offerings, Mirror Mirror and Follow Follow.

Find Echo Echo at the Library

Brittany, Kids World

Guess who, Haiku! by Deanna Caswell

Guess Who Haiku book cover: illustartions of various creatures peaking out around a cloud which holds the title text“two hands hold a book / guessing animals’ puzzles / written in haiku”

This playful treat of a picture book offers the simplest of haiku riddles to younger readers. The answer to each is an animal and each animal then gives the next set of clues. The pastel colors and soft images have a classic nursery sensibility. The author’s endnote explains the elements and origin of haiku in a friendly tone and even suggests another way to read the mini poems.

Toddlers and their grown up readers will share the excitement of words and guessing games. The kiddos will be rewarded for their careful listening and thinking with each page turn.

Find Guess who, Haiku! in the Library

Mary Jo, Kids World

A Bike Like Sergio’s by Maribeth Boelts

A Bike Like Sergio's book cover: illustration of a book riding a bicycle with another walking behind“I wish,” I say, but I know that wishes won’t make money appear.

Sergio has a really great bike. Ruben only wishes he had a bike at all. With his birthday near, Ruben knows that even if he asked for a bike, his family could never afford it. In his despair, Ruben sees a lady drop a dollar bill at the grocery store. Snapping it up fast, Ruben is shocked to find out when he gets home that it’s actually a one hundred dollar bill. Maybe Ruben will get that bike for his birthday after all?

Each day our children are faced with many choices, and the courage it takes to do what’s right doesn’t always come easy. In A Bike Like Sergio’s, Ruben has a difficult decision to make. Using his own reasoning, and a little time, Ruben ultimately finds a non-fairytale ending that doesn’t sugarcoat the realities of life, but rather celebrates doing the right thing above all else. This picture book is recommended for lower and mid-elementary students.

Find A Like Like Sergio's in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

Some Writer by Melissa Sweet

Some Writer book cover: Images of book spines and one book facing out with a man feeding a pig featured onit"Hang on to your hat. Hang on to your hope. Wind the clock, for tomorrow is another day."
"I would rather wait a year than publish a bad children's book, as I have too much respect for children."

If you've ever wondered how a writer becomes a writer, how a writer decides to write children's books, or where ideas for some of your favorite classic children's books came from, you need to read Some Writer! Follow Elwyn Brooks White's journey from his childhood summers spent on a lake in Maine to his years writing for a new (at the time) magazine, The New Yorker, to his inspiration and decision to write books for children. Peppered with quotations from E. B. White's journals, which he kept throughout most of his life, you will get both the inside and outside view of the man, the myth, the writer.

This book is recommended for readers in grades 2-6 who have enjoyed the various works of E. B. White, or who aspire to be writers themselves.

Find Some Writer! in the Library

Brittany, Kids World

Bring Me A Rock! by Daniel Miyares

Bring me a rock book cover: five various sized bugs are holding up a rock upon which a grasshopper stands on top"BRING ME A ROCK! THE BIGGER THE BETTER."

In an Aesop reminiscent of Seuss' Yertle the Turtle, Grasshopper is King of the bugs and he wants a giant throne of rocks...now!
Beetle, Mantis and Centipede all bring the biggest rocks they can find; but, will the littlest bug's pebble be enough?

Told through dialogue and a modern; but, naturalistic art style, Bring Me A Rock! makes the perfect canvas for reading out loud or becoming one of a child's first picture books to read on their own.

Find Bring Me A Rock! in the Library

Jennifer, Kids World

Sophie’s Squash Go to School By Pat Zietlow Miller and Anne Wilsdorf

Sophie's Squash Go To School book cover: an illustration of young girl in pigtails walking on road towards school building with a squash in each arm and wearing a backpack“Sometimes growing a friend just takes time.”

Sophie’s parents said she’d have fun at school. But she didn’t. The chairs were uncomfortable, the milk tasted funny, nobody appreciated her two squash friends Bonnie and Baxter, and Steven just won’t leave her alone! Sophie isn’t interested in making new friends when she already has her squash friends from her garden. But what happens when her food friends start to rot?

School is a huge part of children’s lives, and along with that come dealing with new friendships. For some children who are sensitive, this is no easy task. In this book, Sophie repeatedly rejects any extension of friendship from other children. Until through her own eyes and experiences, she comes to the conclusion that friends are all different, and in the end, worth it.

Sequel to Sophie's Squash.

Find Sophie's Squash Go to School in the Library

Naomi, Kids World

The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game by Nancy Churnin

William Hoy story book cover: an illustration of a baseball player sliding onto base with an umpire's arms out to the sides behind him"His mother waved her arms. She was applauding him."

Have you ever wondered what made baseball umpires start using signs? Find out in this informational picture book!

Not many people knew sign language back in the 1880s and that led to problems for William when trying to pursue his dream of playing baseball professionally. From being paid less than other players to not being able to read the umpire's lips, William couldn't seem to find a way to compete even though he was a great ball player. Remembering his mother waving her arms in applause when he practiced at home, William came up with a solution: the common baseball signs you see used in the game today. William went on to set records in the National and American Leagues playing on many different teams (even the Chicago White Stockings!) and baseball was changed forever... for the better.

With the World Series over but not forgotten, many readers may be interested in learning more about baseball's rich history. This title on the topic would suit readers in 1st grade and up who are interested in baseball, history, or deafness and how to be inclusive to people with disabilities.

Find The William Hoy Story in the Library

Brittany, Kids World

The Infamous Ratsos by Kara Lareau

Infamous Ratsos book cover: illustration of a brickwall and sidewalk cement. In from of the wall two clothed rats stand on tehir hinde legs back to back. Garbage litters the sidewalk around them"There are two kinds of people in this world... Those who are tough, and those who are soft."

The Ratso brothers decide to to do something to make them "look tough." They want their father to be proud of their tough despicable ways. The trouble is prank after prank, something always seem to go array making them look soft instead. Will they ever gain a reputation that will earn their father's respect?

At only 58 pages, this humorous book is perfect for first and second grade readers looking to tackle a chapter book. With simple a vocabulary,  large font and entertaining plot, this transitional read will make taking the plunge into chapter books a delight.

Find The Infamous Ratsos in the Library

Celeste, Kids World

Ghost by Jason Reynolds

ghost book cover: a yellow cover with a boy running off the side’Who you run for?’ he asked. What? Who did I run for? What kind of question was that?
‘I run for me. Who else?’ I replied.”

Castle Crenshaw has been running his whole life. First, he ran from his dad during a violent outburst. Then, he ran from school bullies who torment him because he’s poor, and the principal who is tired of his inability to stay out of trouble. Now, he’s running for pride when he joins the after-school track team and dubs himself Ghost. Will Castle ever find a way to shake off his past, or will he eventually learn that the only way to move forward is to stop running away and start running toward who you want to be?

Ghost, the first in a three book series, is highly recommended for readers, especially reluctant ones, in grades 4 and up who enjoy sports or stories about school and personal problems.

Find Ghost at the Library

Brittany, Kids World

Moana

This Wednesday, Disney's newest animated feature hits theaters. In a twist on the "Disney Princess" tradition, Moana tells the story of a Polynesian teenager being trained by her father to take his place as chief of their village. But Moana wants to see the world first. She sets out on an ocean quest to find a legendary stone that is said to have magical powers. Along the way she runs across the demigod Maui, voiced (and sung!) by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson as a charismatic blowhard.

Before seeing the movie, you can listen to the soundtrack album. Written by the dream team of Hamilton’s Lin-Manuel Miranda, Disney-favorite Mark Mancina, and Samoan singer Opetaia Foa’i, these catchy songs will get you and your kids tapping your toes and singing along with the Polynesian rhythms.

Moana's soundtrack, including a bunch of original songs, the movie score, and instrumental, sing-em-yourself versions is available to stream at hoopladigital.com. Just log in with your Eisenhower Library card and get started listening right away.

Prefer a CD? Place a hold in the library catalog.

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