Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts by Rebecca Hall & Hugo Martinez

“Quantitative historians who use statistical tools to study big-picture historical trends, created a vast database of research on more than 36,000 slave ship voyages that took place over four hundred years…They found that there was a revolt on at least one in ten of these voyages. That was a much higher number than anyone expected…Let me emphasize this point: the more women onboard a slave ship, the more likely a revolt would occur.”


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Where Hope Comes From by Nikita Gill

“Empty out the darkness that has accumulated at the bottom of your heart, all the words you refuse to say. Your heart is not a well to poison; remember that. When the secrets become too heavy to carry, whisper them to the wind to be whisked away.”


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Instructions for Dancing by Nicola Yoon

“Here's what I think. If you get very, very lucky in this life, then you get to love another person so hard and so completely that when you lose them, it rips you apart. I think the pain is the proof of a life well lived and loved.”


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Goldenrod by Maggie Smith

“I am offering the only thing I have. I am holding out my hand, feeding myself to the hungry future.”

This collection of poetry is about objects from everyday life, parenting, love, memories, hope and solitude.


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Central Baptist Book Club: The Survivors

Friday, March 25, 2022, 3:30 PM.

Every month, residents of Central Baptist Village meet in the CBV library to discuss a book chosen by our Outreach Librarian. This month we're reading The Survivors by Jane Harper.


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Of Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia

“The conversation, once everyone sat for dinner, was painstaking, fifteen people desperately waiting their turn to insert an opinion, nobody concerned with what anybody else thought about anything. Perhaps every conversation played out like this, and it was only now, aware of every move, every reaction, that Carmen realized it was a miracle human beings learned anything about each other at all.”


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Bring Your Baggage and Don’t Pack Light by Helen Ellis

“I wore pearls. A single bracelet on my betting arm because I liked the way it looked on my wrist, my hand like a mannequin’s tipped with red nails. I liked the way those pearls rolled against my skin with each action. Pearls made folding feel good. They gave me a sense of composure. I was prim. And in that primness, I was powerful. I looked like a 1950’s TV housewife who’d crawled ring-style out of an episode of Father Knows Best.”


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Fugitive Telemetry by Martha Wells

“And the humans on the station wouldn’t have to think about what I was, a construct made of cloned human tissue, augments, anxiety, depression, and unfocused rage, a killing machine for whichever humans rented me, until I made a mistake and got my brain destroyed by my governor module.”


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Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner

“Hers was tougher than tough love. It was brutal, industrial-strength. A sinewy love that never gave way to an inch of weakness. It was a love that saw what was best for you ten steps ahead, and didn't care if it hurt like hell in the meantime. When I got hurt, she felt it so deeply, it was as though it were her own affliction. She was guilty only of caring too much. I realize this now, only in retrospect. No one in this would would ever love me as much as my mother, and she would never let me forget it.”


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