On November 3rd we will be a polling place only and closed for regular library service.

Mon – Thur: 11:30 am to 7:00 pm | Fri – Sat: 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 | 708-867-7828
Mon – Thur: 11:30 am to 7:00 pm
Fri – Sat: 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
4613 N Oketo Ave
Harwood Heights, IL 60706
708-867-7828

4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 708-867-7828

Mon – Thur: 11:30 am to 7:00 pm | Fri – Sat: 9:30 am to 5:00 pm

Grow Something Different to Eat by Matthew Biggs

Are you interested in changing up your garden, but are not sure where to start? Grow something Different illustrates how to grow fun and unique fruits and vegetables without fear. This is not your typical grocery store produce. The book breaks everything down in succinct and engaging sections, in true DK fashion. The photographs are both useful and inspiring. Each fruit or vegetable has easy to follow infographic charts that allow the reader to determine whether something will be appropriate for their garden. Every entry is marked with a level of difficulty, and a chart laying out the best times of year to sow and harvest.

Next, there is a “Quick Guide” that edges the page of every entry, detailing information such as ideal temperature range, when to water, and the characteristics the fruit or vegetable will take on when it is time to harvest. Further, the book takes a systematic approach to the entire planting process, breaking down the details of preparation, sowing, aftercare, and harvest. There are even cooking tips for each entry! Finally, at the back, there is a list of suppliers, so you can actually find seeds for these uncommon foods. This overall format is especially useful, considering that most of the fruits and vegetables detailed in the book are so unusual, and most readers have probably not attempted growing them before.

The one possible drawback is that this book was written in the U.K., which has slightly different hardiness zones than our place in the U.S. (we are in zone 5, and the U.K. is in zones 6-9). Be careful when following the “When to Grow and Harvest” chart, and focus more on the temperature range in the “Quick Guide”.

If you want to bring something new and fresh to your garden, like wasabi, finger lime, or Chinese artichoke, this is a great book to get you started!

Ask for the book at the Answers Desk, or place a hold in the library catalog.

Categories: Blog.

Grow Something Different to Eat by Matthew Biggs

Are you interested in changing up your garden, but are not sure where to start? Grow something Different illustrates how to grow fun and unique fruits and vegetables without fear. This is not your typical grocery store produce. The book breaks everything down in succinct and engaging sections, in true DK fashion. The photographs are both useful and inspiring. Each fruit or vegetable has easy to follow infographic charts that allow the reader to determine whether something will be appropriate for their garden. Every entry is marked with a level of difficulty, and a chart laying out the best times of year to sow and harvest.

Next, there is a “Quick Guide” that edges the page of every entry, detailing information such as ideal temperature range, when to water, and the characteristics the fruit or vegetable will take on when it is time to harvest. Further, the book takes a systematic approach to the entire planting process, breaking down the details of preparation, sowing, aftercare, and harvest. There are even cooking tips for each entry! Finally, at the back, there is a list of suppliers, so you can actually find seeds for these uncommon foods. This overall format is especially useful, considering that most of the fruits and vegetables detailed in the book are so unusual, and most readers have probably not attempted growing them before.

The one possible drawback is that this book was written in the U.K., which has slightly different hardiness zones than our place in the U.S. (we are in zone 5, and the U.K. is in zones 6-9). Be careful when following the “When to Grow and Harvest” chart, and focus more on the temperature range in the “Quick Guide”.

If you want to bring something new and fresh to your garden, like wasabi, finger lime, or Chinese artichoke, this is a great book to get you started!

Ask for the book at the Answers Desk, or place a hold in the library catalog.

Categories: Blog.