Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM | Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM | Sun: 1PM to 5PM
4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 | 708-867-7828
Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM
Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM
Sun: 1PM to 5PM
4613 N Oketo Ave
Harwood Heights, IL 60706
708-867-7828

4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 708-867-7828

Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM | Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM | Sun: 1PM to 5PM

Hopefully the Scarecrow by Michelle Houts

Book cover for: Hopefully the Scarecrow

“”Hopefully, the scarecrow will keep the birds away,” she said.
He hadn’t known his name was Hopefully.
But he liked it.”

The friendship between a scarecrow and a young girl is the feature of this softly sweet picture book for early elementary readers and listeners. Journey through the seasons with the scarecrow as he listens to the girl read stories that make him feel “a little bit taller and braver” and uses the stories “to keep him company” when he is alone during the winter.

The tale is experienced and interpreted through the scarecrow, whose naïve innocence makes him unaware of certain things that the reader/listener will be able pick up on. Even when “the scarecrow was lonely” his optimism and patience keeps the story warmly pleasant. While this is a great read for families to share, early childhood educators may wish to add this to their repertoire to use to highlight and explain the use of perspective in a book. This tale also serves well as an example of grammar and punctuation as a comma (read by the story sharers but not heard by the scarecrow) changes “Hopefully” from the start of a sentence into a name.

Categories: Kids.

Hopefully the Scarecrow by Michelle Houts

Book cover for: Hopefully the Scarecrow

“”Hopefully, the scarecrow will keep the birds away,” she said.
He hadn’t known his name was Hopefully.
But he liked it.”

The friendship between a scarecrow and a young girl is the feature of this softly sweet picture book for early elementary readers and listeners. Journey through the seasons with the scarecrow as he listens to the girl read stories that make him feel “a little bit taller and braver” and uses the stories “to keep him company” when he is alone during the winter.

The tale is experienced and interpreted through the scarecrow, whose naïve innocence makes him unaware of certain things that the reader/listener will be able pick up on. Even when “the scarecrow was lonely” his optimism and patience keeps the story warmly pleasant. While this is a great read for families to share, early childhood educators may wish to add this to their repertoire to use to highlight and explain the use of perspective in a book. This tale also serves well as an example of grammar and punctuation as a comma (read by the story sharers but not heard by the scarecrow) changes “Hopefully” from the start of a sentence into a name.

Categories: Kids.