Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM | Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM | Sun: 1PM to 5PM
4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 | 708-867-7828
Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM
Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM
Sun: 1PM to 5PM
4613 N Oketo Ave
Harwood Heights, IL 60706
708-867-7828

4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 708-867-7828

Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM | Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM | Sun: 1PM to 5PM

Repetition Builds Literacy

Get Every Child Ready to Read: Tips to Use the 5 Practices: Sing, Talk, Read, Write & Play

It is okay to reread a book multiple times! In fact, research suggests repetition helps build early literacy skills.

Your child will become familiar with the way stories are organized and can even begin to recognize words as you read. As your child memorizes parts of the story, encourage them to say repeated lines with you! In fact, don’t be timid about giving over a favorite book to the child and have them tell you the story in their own words.

Discussions during or after reading can help liven a well-repeated book for the adult reader while mixing in additional literacy practices. Your child may notice different things in the story or make different connections as the plot percolates in their brain. You child may have even developed new experiences that can link to the familiar story.

Reading is part of the 5 early literacy practices supported by Every Child Ready to Read® that will help build the important six skills: print awareness, letter knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary, narrative skills, and print

Categories: Blog and Kids.

Repetition Builds Literacy

Get Every Child Ready to Read: Tips to Use the 5 Practices: Sing, Talk, Read, Write & Play

It is okay to reread a book multiple times! In fact, research suggests repetition helps build early literacy skills.

Your child will become familiar with the way stories are organized and can even begin to recognize words as you read. As your child memorizes parts of the story, encourage them to say repeated lines with you! In fact, don’t be timid about giving over a favorite book to the child and have them tell you the story in their own words.

Discussions during or after reading can help liven a well-repeated book for the adult reader while mixing in additional literacy practices. Your child may notice different things in the story or make different connections as the plot percolates in their brain. You child may have even developed new experiences that can link to the familiar story.

Reading is part of the 5 early literacy practices supported by Every Child Ready to Read® that will help build the important six skills: print awareness, letter knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary, narrative skills, and print

Categories: Blog and Kids.