Closed July 4th & 5th for Independence Day

Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM | Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM | Sun: 1PM to 5PM
4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 | 708-867-7828
Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM
Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM
Sun: 1PM to 5PM
4613 N Oketo Ave
Harwood Heights, IL 60706
708-867-7828

4613 N Oketo Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706 708-867-7828

Mon – Thur: 9AM to 9PM | Fri – Sat: 9AM to 5PM | Sun: 1PM to 5PM

Stealing Home by J. Torres

Take Notice that under Orders Nos. 21, 22, 21 and 24 of the British Columbia Security Commission the following areas were made prohibited areas to all persons of the Japanese race…”

The attack on Pearl Harbor dramatically changed Sandy’s life. Friends he had gone to school with, played baseball with, now called him “a spy.” Even his family was not the same. As the restrictions piled on, the stress played havoc on the relationship he had with his parents as well as the relationship his parents had with each other. Then his father, a doctor, gets sent to “where he was needed the most,” and the family is physically separated. The rest of the family is sent to a camp built out of an old ghost town. “But this was no ghost town. This was our prison. This was now home.

This graphic novel for upper elementary readers provides a relatable perspective on a dark period of North American history. The story is told from Sandy’s point of view, and since Sandy was shielded from the worst of it by the adults around him, the panels do not get too graphic. For all the politics and civil rights at play, this story focuses on the family’s connections to each other so that even though the tale ends with the family still in the camp, the story seems complete. The bad stuff happening around Sandy’s family “is all temporary,” the family itself is set to last. A quick thought-provoking read.

Categories: Kids.

Stealing Home by J. Torres

Take Notice that under Orders Nos. 21, 22, 21 and 24 of the British Columbia Security Commission the following areas were made prohibited areas to all persons of the Japanese race…”

The attack on Pearl Harbor dramatically changed Sandy’s life. Friends he had gone to school with, played baseball with, now called him “a spy.” Even his family was not the same. As the restrictions piled on, the stress played havoc on the relationship he had with his parents as well as the relationship his parents had with each other. Then his father, a doctor, gets sent to “where he was needed the most,” and the family is physically separated. The rest of the family is sent to a camp built out of an old ghost town. “But this was no ghost town. This was our prison. This was now home.

This graphic novel for upper elementary readers provides a relatable perspective on a dark period of North American history. The story is told from Sandy’s point of view, and since Sandy was shielded from the worst of it by the adults around him, the panels do not get too graphic. For all the politics and civil rights at play, this story focuses on the family’s connections to each other so that even though the tale ends with the family still in the camp, the story seems complete. The bad stuff happening around Sandy’s family “is all temporary,” the family itself is set to last. A quick thought-provoking read.

Categories: Kids.