Unplugged by Gordon Korman

“Bay Area Weekly just named me Silicon Valley’s Number One Spoiled Brat. Remember, we’re talking about California. Think of all the other spoiled brats I had to beat out for that title.”


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Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid

“Or that when white people compliment her (“She’s so professional. She’s always on time”), it doesn’t always feel good, because sometimes people are gonna be surprised by the fact that she showed up, rather than the fact that she had something to say when she did.”


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Must Love Books by Shauna Robinson

“It started with the layoffs, and then it just kept getting worse. I thought I’d get out, and I haven’t been able to, and it’s just a lot. I’m fine. It’s just exhausting to be around people sometimes.”


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The Woman Next Door by Yewande Omotoso

Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbors in Katterjin, an exclusive, wealthy subdivision in post-Apartheid South Africa. Katterjin's predominantly white status quo is broken when Hortensia, a hugely successful, black designer, purchases the first house that Marion, an equally successful, white architect, ever designed.


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Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero

The Scooby Gang taught Saturday-morning-cartoon-obsessed-kids that there's a rational explanation for everything and reason triumphs over superstition. Monsters are not real. But what if they were?


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On Juneteenth by Annette Gordon-Reed

“There is no way to get around the fact that, whatever legitimate federalism-based issues were at play, slavery was a central reason Anglo-Texans wanted out of Mexico. Using unpaid labor to clear forests, plant crops, harvest them, and move them to market was the basis of their lives and wealth.”


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We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

When Candace Sinclair was fifteen, something terrible happened, giving her a head injury that causes excruciating headaches. But Candace doesn’t remember what that thing was.


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The Heart Principle by Helen Hoang

Violinist Anna Sun is staggering under her cascading problems. She’s blocked musically and can’t perform in public, let alone in the recording studio. Her therapist is calling out her tricks for masking and pushing Anna to create boundaries with her parents and sister.


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The Plain Janes by Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg

About 15 years ago, Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg published The Plain Janes and its sequel, Janes in Love, through Minx, a young adult imprint of DC Comics. They were a bit ahead of their time. The graphic novels were critical darlings but sales were slow.


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The Grace Year by Kim Liggett

The Grace Year, by Kim Liggett is an eerie look into a fictional cult-like society where young women are thought to gain a wicked magic when they reach womanhood.


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We Ride Upon Sticks by Quan Barry

It’s 1989, and the Lady Falcons of Danvers, Massachusetts are staring down another losing season of field hockey. Instead of going full Bad News Bears, the goalie decides to try something new and pledge her soul to the devil in exchange for victory at the state finals.


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Sweety by Andrea Zuill

“Occasionally Sweety did things that others had a hard time comprehending. Like the day she gave her book report through interpretive dance.”


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The Lightest Object in the Universe by Kimi Eisele

So many post-apocalyptic stories are dismal and cynical, focusing on evil people capitalizing on a new chaotic paradigm to do terrible things to other people. Whenever I've read books like Cormac McCarthy's The Road, Steven King's The Stand, or even when watching The Walking Dead, I've often thought that, in a real post-apocalyptic scenario, people would probably work together to rebuild society, rather than tear each other down.


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